How and Why I Protect Myself from Glyphosate

How and Why I Protect Myself from Glyphosate

Glyphosate is one of the active ingredients in Roundup® – the most commonly used herbicide in the world.  Most of us are exposed to glyphosate every day, often without realizing it.  In fact, an estimated 93% of Americans have glyphosate in their bodies, with children having the highest level, according to a 2015 study by the University of California at San Francisco.  Glyphosate can be found in breast milk, drinking water, rain samples, and the food we feed our families.  It’s sprayed on food crops, playgrounds, parks, school grounds, and yards.   So, how can you escape it?

It’s nearly impossible to completely avoid glyphosate, but there are steps you can take to dramatically reduce your exposure.  Here’s how and why I protect myself from glyphosate.

Why I Protect Myself from Glyphosate:

  1. Glyphosate is a patented antibiotic, which means it kills “good” microbes in your gastrointestinal tract, as well
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Burnout Classified as Legitimate Clinical Syndrome by World Health Organization

Burnout Classified as Legitimate Clinical Syndrome by World Health Organization

Everyone knows the taxing feeling of being burned out from work. Debilitating headaches, mental fatigue, difficulty concentrating—it’s an overwhelming feeling that’s hard to shake. As such, the World Health Organization just released new guidelines defining burnout as “chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed,” in an updated version of the International Classification of Diseases, or ICD-11, NPR reports. It’s also classifying burnout as a clinical syndrome, legitimizing it for the first time.

 

Previously, the WHO had defined burnout as a “state of vital exhaustion,” but the updated language is much more specific. Under the new definition, burnout has three aspects: exhaustion and low energy levels, cynicism or “increased mental distance from one’s job,” and lowered productivity and efficacy in the workplace.

In addition, it’s defined as a work-specific syndrome, unrelated to experiences or … Read the rest

Improving Cognitive Function: The Key to Getting Smarter Starts with Getting Stronger

Improving Cognitive Function: The Key to Getting Smarter Starts with Getting Stronger


Here’s a fairly intuitive statement: exercising your body is good for your cognitive function.

But did you have any idea how true that statement actually is?

Whether you’re a student, boardroom exec, or someone looking to get the most out of their brain power, check out these five reasons why your gym membership is one of the best things you’ve done for your brain lately.

5 Ways That Exercise Boosts Your Cognitive Function

cognitive function

1. Alleviates stress.

Stressed out about that upcoming exam? Resist the urge to pound the caffeine and pull an all-nighter. You may want to pound the pavement and do some pull-ups, instead!

Research shows mental stress can impair learning and memory. Fortunately, exercise is an excellent stress buster.

For one thing, exercise triggers the release of feel-good hormones like endorphins, which can relax you and increase your sense of positivity. Regular exercise also helps you sleep better Read the rest